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Just like most industries, higher education is learning how to incorporate diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) into school strategies. Here are a few ways to do it right.Key Takeaways:Stay open to feedbackBe transparentInvest in leadership trainingPromote diversity at all levelsInvolve students in planningDiversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) initiatives are sweeping all industries and organizations. The trend emphasizes these critical concepts and how they improve everything from company profits to relationships to communities as a whole. However, DEI can be a contentious topic for higher education at times. There have been manySEE DETAILS
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Students will be more engaged with you and the institution when you can foster a sense of belonging and show appreciation     There’s a lot going on in the world impacting college students and young people. They may be feeling overwhelmed by life changes, uncertain about the future of in-person versus online classes, or bombarded by all the information thrown at them each day. They need consistent, authentic support from the institutions they attend and are involved with, especially their colleges and universities.    Are you taking extra stepsSEE DETAILS

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It’s more important than ever to keep people engaged with your digital experiences. Here are 7 creative ways to do it. ​   As the pandemic is still looming, student engagement can be more challenging than ever. People may be feeling lots of uncertainty about what the year will look like and what comes next for higher education. Students need to be engaged and inspired by your content for you to pull them in and retain them, and that starts with digital experiences.   Here are a few strategies youSEE DETAILS

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Higher education institutions are transitioning back to in-person learning, but students may still be worried about the pandemic. Here’s how to make them feel safer and more comfortable during the transition.   ​ ​ Lots of college campuses have reopened and expect students to return to in-person classes. However, some schools are seeing resistance from students who feel like online courses were working just fine and kept them safe from the spread of the virus.   With different laws and mandates around the nation and changing expectations from students, it’sSEE DETAILS

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Gen Z students care about accessibility and personalization. They are constantly using the internet, so they’re not fazed by the shift to online learning.   ​ ​ With each new generation comes a new set of priorities, trends, and cultural shifts. Gen Z has already altered a lot about the current landscape, from social media to work to education. Gen Z is generally thought to comprise people born from 1996 to 2010, so many are either approaching college age or in college.    What we know about Gen Z: TheySEE DETAILS

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Students want the in-person experience virtually with flexible communication options   ​ ​ With the dawn of COVID, institutions of higher learning faced a steep learning curve when it came to providing virtual instruction and facilitating effective communication. While many students migrated to online learning, a recent study of 3,052 students found they remain ambivalent about it, and 58% said the remote learning experience has not been worth the price of tuition.    The future of higher education is likely hybrid with a mixture of online and in-person instruction. ThisSEE DETAILS

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Students now expect a hybrid experience for their higher education where they can physically attend class and catch up with others online if they want to. Here’s how your institution can give them the student experience they demand.   ​ ​ Following the lockdowns ushered in by the coronavirus, students no longer want to return to the rigidity that ruled higher learning before. Before the pandemic, online education was not as reputable as it is now and attending classes in person was often seen as the only path to aSEE DETAILS

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With each passing generation, modes of communication change. Your higher ed institution needs to adapt its recruitment strategies or risk being passed over for rival colleges and universities.   ​ ​ Just a few years ago, Baby Boomers were coming in for campus visits with their kids who were Millennials. Today, Generation X parents are coming in with Gen Z kids. Each of these generations has a different outlook about life and different expectations when it comes to higher education. No online student recruitment campaign can be set up forSEE DETAILS

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With online education firmly established as part of the norm going forward, higher ed institutions are still being challenged to prove the value of online learning.   ​   A short while ago, an online degree would not have held the same weight in many circles as one acquired through learning in person. Online learning simply was not an attractive option for anyone except those under restrictive circumstances — busy professionals, busy parents, and students from underprivileged backgrounds.   Cue the coronavirus pandemic. Not long after people, including students, wereSEE DETAILS

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Even before the pandemic, a significant number of students looked to online education as a solution to otherwise insurmountable challenges to on-campus learning.   ​ ​ There’s been growing interest in the possibility and merits of online education, with many institutions asking questions about how to bridge the gap between the in-person learning experience and the online experience. But online experience is nothing new. Over the last two decades, online learning has provided recourse and options to millions of individuals — both professionals looking to add to their knowledge andSEE DETAILS

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